For more information on MDR1, HD and CEA, please click on links below

MDR1
(click here for pdf documents for printing)

Kennel Club DNA screening
Hip Dysplasia

Kennel Club HD Scheme

CEA/PRA

Kennel Club screening programme

VETERINARY MEDICINE DIRECTORATE
(for reporting adverse reaction to medication)

 

Update - April 2016........Alabama rot or idiopathic cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) is a condition, often fatal, in dogs,  It is believed to be caused by toxins produced by bacteria such as Escherichia coli (commonly known as E. coli).  The initial symptoms are skin lesions on the legs, chest and abdomen, with eventual renal failure in about 25% of cases.  It was first noted in greyhounds in the US.

In November 2012 the first cases were identified in the UK.  In January 2014, the outbreak in England was identified as having the same or similar cause as Alabama rot,  although a wide range of breeds were affected. The disease has continued to spread across England, with a case being reported as far north as North Yorkshire in March 2015. A UK map (HERE) confirmed (with post mortem) and unconfirmed (without post mortem) cases of Alabama rot since December 2012.

read more about it HERE

 


Statement from the KC - March 2014

Recording CEA and prcd-PRA DNA tests
The Kennel Club would wish to clarify the position with regard to the recording of DNA test results for both prcd-PRA and CEA/CH.

Both these DNA tests carry patents in the UK and most other European countries. The patents are owned by Cornell University in the US, and are licensed exclusively to OptiGen worldwide. They also have non-exclusive licensing of the CL test (for Border Collies) in Europe (and exclusive use of this patent in the USA). It is important to note therefore that the KC will only officially record the DNA results for these diseases if they have been tested by OptiGen (or Genetic Technologies in Australia who have a licence to perform the tests).

Part of the patent includes the advertisement and recording of results and therefore whilst this patent is still in force, the Kennel Club will only be publishing the outcome of Optigen tests. The position the KC has taken stems purely from legal ramifications and has no reason to question the quality and reliability of tests offered by other labs. For clarification, only results of prcd-PRA or CEA/CH DNA tests issued by Optigen will be recorded by the KC, and these results will appear on registration certificates, in the BRS and online via Mate Select.

However, we are aware that other laboratories such as Laboklin and Idexx have made arrangements with Optigen so that if any of their clients want either prcd-PRA or CEA/CH results recorded, these labs will send the DNA to Optigen and they will issue a result / certificate back to laboratory.


 


 

You can report a suspected adverse reaction or lack of efficacy to a veterinary medicine by clicking on the VMD banner below - this will take you to the online reporting site.

This scheme is run by the VMD's Pharmacovigilance Unit and is used to collect information from veterinary professionals and the general public on suspected adverse reactions and lack of efficacy to veterinary medicines. We collect reports on both licensed and unlicensed veterinary medicines, and human medicines used to treat animals under the cascade. The information that you provide can help to improve the safe and effective use of veterinary medicines.

 



MDR 1

+/+ = Clear
+/- Carrier
-/- Affected

Sire
/
Dam
Offspring
Clear
/
Clear
100% clear
Clear
/
Carrier
50%  Clear + 50% carriers
Clear
/
Affected
100% carriers
Carrier
/
Clear
50% clear + 50% affected
Carrier
/
Carrier
25% clear + 25% affected + 50% carriers
Affected
/
Clear
100%  carriers
Affected
/
Carrier
50% carriers + 50% affected
Affected
/
Affected
100% affected

A dog can only be 'hereditarily clear' if both parents have been DNA tested as clear/normal for the MDR1 gene.




PDF DOCUMENTS FOR PRINTING

MDR1 FACTSHEET

MDR1 LEAFLET
(list of drugs that cause sensitivity for dogs with the MDR1 gene mutation)

VETERINARY CONFERENCE
What you dont know about P-Glycprotein can hurt you (and your patients!) by Katrina Mealey